All posts by Shetland Life

Gone fishing

Serene LK 297

Excuse us; we’ve gone fishing… but we’re taking you with us!

Join Shetland Life for this fishy March issue as we take to the high seas with a trip through Shetland’s pelagic past and present. Ryan Taylor explores the history of the Swan as she enters uncertain waters and we settle down and chat to Bobby Polson from the pelagic trawler, Serene, and find out what it’s really like to skipper one of these impressive mid-water trawlers.

Elsewhere in the issue, Ali Grundon Robertson, our environmental guru delves into the peat and explains the importance of peatland restoration, while Alex Garrick-Wright reports on the success of the Imposters’ first ‘away game’ in Edinburgh.

There’s so much to shout about in Shetland at the moment, and with spring just around the corner, we’re keen to keep in touch with you. Give us a shout with any comments or suggestions at sleditor@shetlandtimes.co.uk and remember to use our hashtag for the chance to be featured online or in the magazine #myshetlandlife.

As ever, have a great month and enjoy Shetland Life!

 

In the boatshed

boat building workshop

Up-Helly-A’ is over for another year, and those of you who have completed a dry January are hopefully toasting your success with a glass of something strong and sweet. We’ve really enjoyed seeing all your #myshetlandlife posts and photos this month – keep ‘em coming, we love to hear from you.

For this month’s issue of Shetland Life, we’ve immersed ourselves in the past. And, what better place to escape February’s biting cold? We visit Tommy Isbister in his boatshed and find out about his love of boat building and woodwork.
Maybe you’re thinking about celebrating Candlemas this year? Then let Alex Garrick-Wright take you on a journey through Shetland’s fascinating world of calendar traditions.
Or have you ever wondered about some of our place-names? Eileen Brooke-Freeman discusses some of the piggy place names around Shetland – this is the Year of the Pig after all.
And for those who are in search of a good story, and the odd trow, there are plenty of those to while away the last of the winter nights…

Finally, looking ahead we’ve been thinking about ways to get fit and beat the bulge. If you want to find out what we’re planning, pick up a copy of Shetland Life – out tomorrow!

A new year, a new start

This month Shetland Life are set to dive into the New Year feet first and we hope that you will join us for the ride. We go through the keyhole, taking a sneaky peek behind the scenes of Squad 43. And, with Up-Helly-A’ looming, we meet this year’s Jarl, John Nicolson, and discover how he became the fourth Nicolson Jarl – following in the footsteps of his father and brothers before him.

For those opting for better health and wellbeing in 2019, look out for our new columnist, Ali Grundon Robertson who this month focuses on consumerism. Finally, our new feature – in collaboration with RSPB Scotland – introduces a monthly Nature Calendar and examines the health benefits of a daily dose of fresh air, ensuring that you put your best foot forward into the New Year.

What are you waiting for? Look out for this month’s Shetland Life, in shops and online now!

The spirit of Christmas

This month we celebrate local examples of altruism: from Michael Grant’s selfless work with RNLI to the collective good-will and energy that have gone towards fund-raising for an MRI scanner. If you’re feeling touched by the spirit of Christmas, our special advent calendar provides a good deed suggestion for every day of the month…

Always, don’t miss our kindness nominations! Debbie Ratter’s (pictured) tale of seasonal kindness brought tears to our eyes.

25th anniversary of seminal album

Shetland was coming to terms with Braer disaster, John Major was Prime Minister and Meatloaf’s I’d Do Anything For Love (But I Won’t Do That) was #1 when Shetland band Bongshang released their seminal debut album Crude on 19th November 1993.

We caught up with two members of the notably enigmatic band to find out the back story.

Bryan Peterson says: “We were all fans of each other’s playing when we formed in 1992. The much-missed Leonard [Scollay], was simply the best fiddler any of us had heard, and JJ made the banjo ‘cool’”.

JJ Jamieson recalls: “Kipper [Christopher Anderson] was a powerful yet subtle drummer, Neil [Preshaw] was a versatile and textural guitarist, and Bryan was a cheeky 15-year-old with a gift for funky basslines.”

There was already the beginnings of an acoustic revival in Scotland. Leonard was in Rock, Salt & Nails at the time and JJ was fresh from the Edinburgh acoustic scene having rubbed shoulders with the likes of Swamptrash and Critterhill Varmints. But Crude was considered to be ahead of its time and one of the first recordings of the Scottish Folk Funk or “Acid Croft” scene, pre-dating debut albums by the likes of Shooglenifty, Peatbog Fairies and Afro Celt Soundsystem.

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 JJ says: “The album was a snapshot of our live set. We didn’t think of recording an album as a process in itself, it was just a case of recording the tunes.”

“It was natural for Stevie [Hook] to engineer for us as he was a friend of the band and did our live sound. There wasn’t a recording studio in Shetland, but the Garrison Theatre had a reel-to-reel tape recorder that we were able to use between performances in the theatre.

“It was a very basic setup. Just us playing live on the stage then overdubbing some of the acoustic parts in the lighting booth. Kipper was a loud drummer so it was a challenge to get a good recording of the acoustic instruments with him hammering at.”

 Bryan adds: “The technology was very primitive by today’s standards. We had an effects box to add a bit of reverb and echo and that was it. There was no chance to go back and edit anything when you’re recording to tape. You have to nail it.”

“We added a recording of Leonard’s favourite lawnmower and a recording of a prayer caller a friend of the band had made in Pakistan.”

“It didn’t take long. The whole process was probably finished in a couple of months”.

Were members of the band aware that they were producing something ground-breaking? JJ says: “We were aware what we were doing was different, but we weren’t doing it to be different. It just came naturally. And whether or not it would be popular with audiences wasn’t a concern. We practised a lot and only played one gig in Shetland before the album came out. We were just pleasing ourselves, experimenting and having a laugh.”

Bryan explains:  “There was no formula. We all had different styles and influences. We listened to lots of music together and swapped a lot of albums between ourselves, so ideas were everywhere.”

“It was only when we read the reviews that we realised we’d done something of some significance”.

 Unusually for the time, the band released Crude on their own label ‘Doovf’ and was the first independent CD to be produced in Shetland. It was also the best-selling album in Shetland in 1993, and the band sold many more nationally and while on tour around Europe.

 The band was approached by a distributor who offered to help them market the album internationally.

Bryan recalls: “That didn’t go well. Despite having our album in shops around the world we didn’t get paid. To get out of the deal a couple of us had to pay a visit to the distributors’ office in Glasgow and make a few promises about negative consequences that may befall him.”

Bryan is cagey about how many sales have been clocked up: “not because it’s a secret. We just lost track, but it’s quite a few.”

The band used the proceeds to invest in their own recording equipment and produced two more studio albums, The Hurricane Jungle in 1996 and Vy-lo-fone in 1999. In 2013 all three Bongshang albums were remastered in Mareel by Iain Waddell and released on Spotify and iTunes.

Bongshang have been reclusive for the past 15 years or so, and instead of live performances prefer to release occasional videos.

When pressed on what we can expect next, the boys said we write and record a lot of music. We enjoy the process. Releasing albums isn’t high on our agenda but we might share some recordings in future.”

Listen here: http://bit.ly/iTunesBongshang or here: http://bit.ly/SpotifyBongshang

The complete version of this article is available in November’s Shetland Life.

 

Be inspired

In November’s issue, we celebrate the boundless creativity of Shetlanders in textiles, literature, the performing arts, music and technology.

We speak to Hazel Tindall about her enduring love of wool, hear about the process behind The Impostors’ improvised comedy and meet the finalists at the Taste of Shetland cooking competition.

 

After dark special

The nights are fair drawing in. Luckily, Shetland abounds with opportunities to get involved in creative projects and make the most of these long dark evenings.

Our October celebrates all that nocturnal Shetland has to offer: from pub life to night classes.  Alex Garrick-Wright meets with Isleburgh Drama Group and Frankie Valente draws on an inspirational friend for some winter project ideas.

Draw the curtains, light the fire and enjoy!